What Everyone Wants

Written in the stars

Drowning in our paradise.

It’s not what I thought.

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Stories- Mine

my eyes can’t lie

as I saw you walking by

it’s clear to see you’re divine

I just gotta sigh

because you’re so damn fine

Silence Fallen by Patricia Briggs

Silence Fallen (Mercy Thompson, #10)Silence Fallen by Patricia Briggs

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Book ten in the Mercy Thompson series! I can’t believe how far these books have come. I’m so glad I discovered Moon Called all those years ago!

Anyhoo, in Patricia Briggs latest installment, Silence Fallen, we find Mercy Thompson kidnapped by some very old and powerful vampires to be used as leverage against her alpha werewolf husband, Adam Hauptman and the Tri-Cities vampires. Mercy finds herself in Europe, naked and unable to contact the pack. But Mercy can take care of herself and her kidnappers are going to discover she has more than a few tricks up her sleeve.

In Silence Fallen, the point of view changes between Mercy and Adam. At the beginning, Briggs notes that chapters aren’t linear and to pay attention to what Mercy writes at the start of each chapter. The “time jumps” if you want to call them that, don’t impact the story enough to confuse the reader because of the changing pov.

I loved that we got to see inside Adam’s head! His relationship with Mercy has grown so much and in this book we really see how far they’ve both come since Moon Called.

What I loved and hated was the vampire, Bonarata. He’s introduced as the “villain” of the story and throughout the book I couldn’t figure out this vampire. I hated that I couldn’t because I like to believe I’ve become quite proficient at solving little mysteries, but I also loved it because it was exciting to be surprised. More than halfway through, I did feel at times being pulled in too many directions as more happened in the story and the pov changes didn’t help in that aspect.

And of course, what is a Mercy book without some badassery? Mercy delivers like always as she pushes her walker abilities just a little more to save the day. I love how Briggs digs a little deeper into Mercy’s walker abilities in each book. Since Moon Called, Briggs writing has captured me with her ability to unfold stories within stories.

If you’re a fan of the series this is a must read! If this is the first time you’re hearing about this series, then I highly recommend you go out and pick up the first book, Moon Called.

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Lost in Time

Grains of sand drifting

through azure waves steals your scream.

Sunset; end of day.

Vampire’s Kiss by Ella Summers

Vampire's Kiss (Legion of Angels #1)Vampire’s Kiss by Ella Summers

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

As a fan of Nalini Singh’s Guild Hunter series, I’m surprised it took me this long to discover Vampire’s Kiss by Ella Summers. With powerful sexy angels, dangerous vampires and a kick ass electric blonde heroine, it would seem like reading another of Singh’s books. But it’s Summers’ writing style, world building and themes that help create a story that stands apart from Singh’s.

The first book in Summers’ Legion of Angels series, Vampire’s Kiss introduces a world full of monsters and gods where being “just” human is a risk. Leda Pierce is a bounty hunter who has no magical abilities but for Leda that’s okay as she has a family that loves her. Everything changes when her brother is taken and Leda’s only way to get him back is to join the Legion of Angels. As an elite group of warriors, they are given gifts from the gods to serve and protect but Leda has to survive the initiation first. Throw in an insanely sexy and dangerous angel named Nero, and Leda’s journey just got a lot more interesting.

Vampire’s Kiss is a great introduction into Summers’ world. I definitely recommend this book to fans of Nalini Singh’s Guild Hunter series.

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Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon

Everything, EverythingEverything, Everything by Nicola Yoon

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

More than halfway through Nicola Yoon’s Everything, Everything, I was pleasantly surprised. I say pleasantly because the surprise was happy and unexpected. Of course I had heard of this book with its colorful cover and five-star reviews, but I never picked it up and I’m glad that I finally did.

Everything, Everything tells the story of eighteen-year old Madeline Whittier who is literally allergic to the world. In all her eighteen years she has never been outside, but that changes when all-black wearing Olly moves in next door. Soon Madeline finds herself answering to Maddy, falling in love, and wanting a life she can’t have.

I thoroughly enjoyed Yoon’s storytelling from start to finish. The illustrations within Everything, Everything helps the reader to discover who Maddy is and are fun to read. Maddy herself is a likable and fun character even though she’s sick. Yoon’s writing is solid as she takes you on a journey of love and risks.

Representation matters, and it’s wonderful that there’s such a popular book by a woman of color about a woman of color. Yes, this book had me a bit teary during some chapters but I still recommend this book to everyone. Now that I’ve completed Everything, Everything, The Suns Is Also a Star is definitely on my tbr list.

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Daughter of the Forest by Juliet Marillier

Daughter of the Forest (Sevenwaters, #1)Daughter of the Forest by Juliet Marillier

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Daughter of the Forest is a magical tale of a girl who is willing to take on an impossible task to save her brothers and herself.

Using elements from The Six Swans, Juliet Marillier combines romance, magic and adventure to create her own fantasy tale. Marillier’s story follows Sorcha, the youngest and only daughter of Lord Colum, Ruler of Sevenwaters. More in tuned with nature and running barefoot than embroidery lessons and marriage prospects, Sorcha soon finds she is her brothers only hope as they are placed under a witch’s enchantment. Sorcha must sew six shirts from the nettle plant that is painful to touch, all while staying mute. Her task is further complicated when she finds herself falling in love.

Marillier’s detailed writing lends to wonderful character development that pulls the reader in emotionally. A more romantic fantasy tale, Marillier’s Daughter of the Forest is a must read. As the first book in the Sevenwaters series, it sets the stage for later books. While I enjoyed Daughter of the Forest,I did not feel compelled to read more as they tell the stories of later generations.

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What She Has

It’s Her ocean full

of abysmal emotions

She wants to drown in.

The Dressmaker by Rosalie Ham

The DressmakerThe Dressmaker by Rosalie Ham

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

It was watching the trailer for Kate Winslet’s next movie that led me to reading The Dressmaker. As a fan of the beautifully talented Kate Winslet and fashion, I was instantly entranced by the 2 minute trailer and needed to read the book that inspired the film.

The Dressmaker by Rosalie Ham takes place in the 1950s as it follows dressmaker Mrytle “Tilly” Dunnage as she returns to her small hometown in Australia to take care of her sick mother. Right away the little town of Dungatar makes it know that Tilly is not welcome back. As the story progresses, Tilly’s past is slowly revealed while she begins to transform the people of Dungatar with her fashionable creations.

Just as Tilly’s creations transform the people of Dungatar, Ham’s beautiful syntax brings vivid imagery to every page. Ham does an exceptional job of revealing Tilly’s secrets as well as those of the townspeople, to the point where you don’t know what’s going to happen next.

Filled with secrets, love, loss and determination, The Dressmaker will leave you thinking about it weeks after reading. I recommend this book to anyone who loves fashion and dark comedy and is looking for something to cleanse their palate.

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The Last of the Firedrakes by Farah Oomerbhoy

The Last of the Firedrakes (The Avalonia Chronicles #1)The Last of the Firedrakes by Farah Oomerbhoy

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

As I was browsing through the young adult section in the library, the cover of Farah Oomerbhoy’s The Last of the Firedrakes caught my eye and so I added it to my book haul.

The first in Oomerbhoy’s Avalonia Chronicles, it tells the story of 16-year-old Aurora Darlington who gets kidnapped through a portal to a land of magic. Okay, right away this book grabbed my attention as I spent the night reading half the book before falling asleep. But I admit that picking this book back up wasn’t easy.

In the first half of Oomerbhoy’s novel, Aurora is introduced as a young girl who is bullied and her family’s treatment of her rivals that of the Dursley’s. Right away I’m rooting for Aurora because in my mind there’s no place but up for her to go in gaining self-confidence. As Aurora explores this new land, forms friendships and discovers who she really is, its easy to become annoyed with her. I often found myself asking “why” to her actions as I couldn’t understand her feelings/motives throughout most of the book. It isn’t until the end that Aurora finally seems to gain confidence and come into her own but by then its into someone who the journey doesn’t necessarily reflect.

As this is only the first book in Oomerbhoy’s Avalonia Chronicles I do look forward to reading more. Oomerbhoy’s writing is solid and she does a great job getting right into the action. I do hope her second book plunges right into action! I recommend this book to anyone looking to start a new light YA fantasy series.

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